Breastfeeding is by far the healthiest and most natural option for babies.  Research has shown that breastfeeding is extremely beneficial for a baby’s nutrition, digestion, and development.  Yet breastfeeding is not without its challenges. Many mothers, especially new moms, find that breastfeeding can be a struggle.  In fact, most moms start out with the intention of breastfeeding their baby for 6 months or more but fall short because of nursing difficulties.  They seek help from medical professionals, lactation consultants, and other moms, but sometimes nothing seems to work or help.  What nursing moms might not realize is that spinal misalignments can have a negative effect on breastfeeding.  Consulting a Charlotte chiropractor can lead to an easier breastfeeding experience for both mom and baby.

Common Nursing Difficulties

When you first find out you are pregnant, the thought of nursing and bonding with your baby can bring much joy.  But when it comes to actually nursing an infant, unforeseen difficulties may arise.  For instance, some mothers struggle to get their baby to latch.  Even if the baby can latch properly, sometimes he or she may struggle to suck.  Even more frustrating, some babies can’t seem to put together the motions of sucking, swallowing, and breathing.  Moms often report their babies only want to feed on one side and will refuse the other side if offered.  Even if nursing seems to be going okay, some babies may act fussy or like they are dissatisfied after a feeding.  Any of these common nursing difficulties can lead to overwhelming feelings of inefficiency that could cause mothers to give up breastfeeding altogether.  If this sounds like you, know that there is hope. Before you give up on nursing, seek help from Charlotte chiropractor Dr. Grant Lisetor.

How Does Chiropractic Help With Nursing?

Difficult breastfeeding can often be linked to spinal misalignments.  When the central nervous system is unable to communicate properly with the rest of the body, it can affect your and you baby’s abilities to breastfeed adequately.  This may be why baby is having trouble latching or swallowing.  It can also be the reason they prefer one side over another.  Additionally, trauma at birth could also lead to nursing problem.  For example, a baby that had trouble passing through the birth canal could have spinal misalignments from use of forceps or other pulling on the head and neck during delivery.  Spinal misalignments in the baby could cause them to not want to turn their necks one way or the other to nurse because of pain, leading to favoring one side.  Both mom and baby can benefit exponentially from chiropractic care for improving whole body health. Dr. Grant Lisetor of Greater Life Chiropractic has worked with many women who have experienced frustration when nursing to correct spinal misalignments through gentle adjustments.

Many Women Have Experienced Nursing Success with Chiropractic Care

Nursing is a wonderful bonding experience.  But if you are one of the many women who have had a frustrating experience, trust that there is hope through chiropractic.  Case studies show that chiropractic care can and does help many women and infants with nursing difficulties.  One case study focused on an 8-day-old infant with latching problems.  The infant could not produce a vacuum suction and lacked the ability to suck.  The infant had experienced a difficult birth which resulted in several spinal misalignments.  After chiropractic care to correct misalignment, breastfeeding improved and nursing difficulties were dissolved.

If you or a friend are struggling to breastfeed, chiropractic care can help.  Contact Dr. Grant Lisetor of Greater Life Chiropractic today to set up a consultation for breastfeeding success.

 

Sources

Fry, L.M. “Chiropractic and breastfeeding dysfunction: A literature review, Journal of Clinical Chiropractic Pediatrics. 2014;14(2):1151-1155. http://jccponline.com/breastfeeding.pdf

Holleman, A., Nee, J., Knapp, S. “Chiropractic management of breast-feeding difficulties: a case report”, J Chiropr Med. 2011 Sep; 10(3): 199–203. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3259991/