Core Strengthening and Chiropractic to Minimize Spine Injury Risk

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No matter your age, level of athleticism, and overall health, being active is extremely important. The more we move, the more our joints are lubricated and our muscles are strengthened. We also can manage our weight better and improve our cardiovascular health more effectively by staying active and exercising regularly.

But when we’re worried about hurting ourselves or getting injured, it can be hard to stay motivated to get moving and work out. Back pain is hugely prominent in our society, and sleeping in a weird position, moving the wrong way, or lifting something too heavy can exacerbate back pain substantially, leaving us with limited mobility and a very real fear of hurting ourselves more. Spine injuries can happen at any time and in any situation, and while the pain and recovery may be minor, it could also be very severe and life-altering.

Thankfully, there are some things we can do to improve our body’s health and function so that we minimize our risk of injury and subsequent pain. This allows us to remain active, get healthier and stronger, and live and move with confidence.

Core Strengthening

The trunk area of our body has the spine, ribcage, and pelvis, but otherwise no other bones. The primary support of these huge bone structures is our core muscles. They are responsible for not only holding up the bulk of our bones in our torso, but also protecting organs and encouraging natural bodily processes. When these core muscles are weak, you can have pain from overusing them. You may also have spinal pain because the spine is forced to take on more pressure and force due to the surrounding weak muscles.

Strengthening your core muscles is hugely beneficial for not only reducing existing back pain, but also for minimizing the likelihood of injury in the future. It improves balance and stability, both of which can help reduce pain and injury. Some studies have shown that doing core-strengthening and stabilization exercises consistently for six weeks is actually more effective at reducing low back pain than traditional physical therapy.

The best core strengthening exercises to reduce or prevent spinal injuries and subsequent back pain will take into account your physical strength, flexibility, and pain level. These stretches and exercises from Princeton University’s Athletic Medicine department are a great starting point. You can ask your Charlotte chiropractor for more insight into core strengthening exercises or do an online search for more ideas.

Chiropractic Care

Because chiropractic aims to improve spinal health and alignment, it can also make a big impact on the back pain you’re trying to get rid of. Chiropractic care helps to balance your muscles and can improve the mobility in your spine, leading to fewer injuries and less pain in the future. It also improves blood flow and overall body functions, meaning your efforts to exercise more and be healthier are further encouraged by your regular chiropractic adjustments.

The dream team of core strengthening exercises and chiropractic care are a great way to tackle current back pain and prevent injury and pain in the future. Talk to Dr. Grant Lisetor at Greater Life Chiropractic in Charlotte to learn more about how neurologically-based chiropractic care can help you.

Sources

Akhtar, M.W., Karimi, H., Gilani, S.A. “Effectiveness of core stabilization exercises and routine exercise therapy in management of pain in chronic non-specific low back pain: A randomized controlled clinical trial.” Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences, 2017 Jul-Aug; 33(4): 1002–1006. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5648929/.

Bliven, K.C.H., Anderson, B.E. “Core Stability Training for Injury Prevention.” Sports Health, 2013 Nov; 5(6): 514–522. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3806175/.

“Lumbar/Core Strength and Stability Exercises.” University Health Services, Princeton University Athletic Medicine. https://uhs.princeton.edu/sites/uhs/files/documents/Lumbar.pdf

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