When we were young kids, we soaked up new information like sponges. Just think about the amount of information a child absorbs from the time they’re born to the time they’re in kindergarten. It’s just 5 or 6 short years, but they go from babies who can’t sit, talk, or even chew to kids who can read, dress themselves, and even help prepare dinner.

Now fast forward to the life of a senior citizen who has had a stroke. She may need to relearn how to walk, talk, and eat, even though she’s been doing all of those things for decades. In most cases, a stroke victim can absolutely relearn how to do all of those things. But what about when she can’t? Sometimes, our brains are unable to learn new skills or adapt to new ways of thinking.

Whether we can or cannot learn new things has everything to do with our cognitive function and the overall health of our bodies. This all has to do with neuroplasticity, or the brain’s ability to change and grow throughout a person’s lifetime. While everyone has the innate ability for their brain to change for the better, certain physical and emotional problems can cause the brain to struggle with positive neuroplasticity, minimizing the amount of positive growth that is possible and sometimes even bringing about negative neuroplasticity, which leads to a less efficient brain and reduced cognitive function.

The Role of Neuroplasticity

In general, neuroplasticity happens on its own without any assistance from you or external sources. But when there is a problem with cognitive function, we need to dive deeper to understand why and to determine the best solution to this very serious problem. People with Alzheimer’s or dementia can struggle a great deal with neuroplasticity, as can stroke victims and others who have suffered from severe head or spinal injuries.

The brain needs to be able to grow, change, and progress, otherwise it will be digressing and causing a number of problems in the individual. While many focus on the physical challenges of negative neuroplasticity, such as losing the ability to feed oneself, remember people and things, and so on, there is also a significant effect on our emotional function and mental health when negative neuroplasticity is present. If you see yourself as a negative person who always sees the worst in situations or has an extremely fatalistic mindset, you may feel like you can never change. However, due to neuroplasticity, you can actually change the way you think, feel, and react to certain situations or emotions. But your brain has to be healthy enough to do so, and that’s where chiropractic comes in.

How Chiropractic Affects Positive Neuroplasticity

Chiropractic adjustments have been proven to impact brain activity, showing us that the connection between the spine and the brain is hugely significant in overall cognitive function. We know that we need our brains to have the ability to change and grow, and chiropractic care can encourage this positive neuroplasticity. Because the spine can sometimes get shifted out of proper alignment, the vertebrae can push on the nerves of the spinal cord and impact the overall function of the body. When this happens, messages to and from the brain can get interrupted and blood flow to the brain can be reduced, negatively impacting overall cognitive function.

With chiropractic care from Charlotte chiropractor Dr. Grant Lisetor, you’ll encourage proper brain development, positive neuroplasticity, and a healthier body. Contact Greater Life Chiropractic today to set up your first consultation for Charlotte chiropractic care.

 

 

Sources

“Chiropractic and Consciousness – How We Influence Brain Plasticity.” Australian Spinal Research Foundation, February 2019. https://spinalresearch.com.au/chiropractic-and-consciousness-how-we-influence-brain-plasticity/.

“Improving Neuroplasticity Through Chiropractic Adjustments.” Ideal Spine, Sept 2017. https://idealspine.com/improving-neuroplasticity-through-chiropractic-adjustments/.

“Research: Beyond a Doubt, Adjusting the Subluxated Spine Changes Brain Function.” Australian Spinal Research Foundation, April 2016. https://spinalresearch.com.au/research-beyond-doubt-adjusting-subluxated-spine-changes-brain-function/.